ARCHIVED - Service Canada Client Satisfaction Survey: 2008 Survey

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Perceptions of Service

As presented on the following pages, respondents were asked a host of CMT questions relating to the service they received.

Across all of the indicators tested, we find between 75 and 96 per cent of clients agreeing with all but one of the CMT statements. Responses were all relatively stable since 2006.

We find over four in five clients agreeing that they received service in the language of their choice (96% agree), that they were treated fairly (85%), that staff were courteous (81%), that they were informed of everything they needed to do to get the service (83%), that they were satisfied with the accessibility of the service (84%) and that information they received was clear and easy to understand (83%).

Between 74 and 78 per cent agreed that they were confident their personal information will remain confidential (78%), that it was clear what to do if they encountered a problem (78%), that staff provided what they needed (74%), that decisions were clearly explained (77%), that staff were responsive to their needs (76%), that staff were knowledgeable and competent (76%), that they received consistent information or advice (76%) and that they were satisfied with the amount of time it took to get the service they were seeking (75%).

Only on what is perhaps the most stringent CMT indicator do we find less than three in four clients agreeing. Two in three clients (66%) agreed that staff went the extra mile to make sure they got what they needed, and even here we find 11% of clients indicating that the question was not applicable.

Perception of Service chart 1

  • Agreement that staff were courteous increases with frequency of contact and number of programs accessed. Agreement is also highest for 1 800 O-Canada clients (83% strongly agree);
  • 1 800 O-Canada clients are also most likely to strongly agree that they were satisfied with the accessibility of the service (70%) and that the information received was easy to understand (67%);
  •  CPP clients are least likely to strongly agree that they are confident their personal information will remain confidential (47%)

Perception of Service chart 2

  • Agreement that staff gave you what you need or guided you to others, that staff were responsive to your needs and that staff were knowledgeable and competent all increase with frequency of contacts and number of contacts;
  • Agreement that staff gave you what you need is higher among 1 800 O-Canada, EAP and OAS clients;
  • Agreement that staff were responsive to your needs and knowledgeable and competent are higher among 1 800 O-Canada and CPPD clients;
  • Agreement that you were satisfied with the amount of time it took to get the service decreases with the number of contacts clients had with Service Canada;
  • Belief that staff went the extra mile is higher among 1 800 O-Canada, CPPD and GIS clients.

We find macro level satisfaction with services received high and stable since 2006, with over four in five (83%) saying they were satisfied with the service they received from Service Canada versus just over one in 20 (7%) indicating they were dissatisfied. We find the same number (also unchanged since 2006) indicating that “in the end” they got what they needed.

Macro Level Satisfaction Chart

  • Overall satisfaction decreases slightly with the number of contacts clients had, with 89% of those with one contact saying they were satisfied versus 81% of those with over ten contacts;
  • Regionally, satisfaction is somewhat higher in Quebec (87% satisfied) and lowest in BC (79%);
  • In terms of client segments, satisfaction is highest among newcomers (79%) and lowest among Aboriginal Canadians (70%).

Just over one in ten clients (12%, stable since 2006) indicated that they encountered a problem in their dealings with Service Canada. No one problem dominates, with clients mentioning the length of application processing or receiving information, information that was conflicting, incorrect or unclear, government errors, a variety of issues related to their dealings with staff.

Problems Encountered 1 Chart

  • Perceptions of experiencing problems with service increases slightly with frequency of contacts, number of service channels used and number of programs accessed;
  • The perception of having encountered problems is also slightly higher for EAP, AIGP, CPPD and EI clients.

Among those clients who did experience a problem, we find just under three in ten (28%, unchanged since 2006) indicating that they were satisfied with how the problem was resolved versus four in ten (43%, also relatively unchanged) indicating that they were dissatisfied.

Problems Encountered 2 Chart

Turning to satisfaction with specific service offerings, we again find strong and stable satisfaction levels across six program areas with a minimum of three in four clients declaring themselves to be satisfied (please see charts on following page).

Satisfaction with 1 800 O-Canada remains the top rated program offering in terms of both overall satisfaction and intensity of satisfaction (those offering the highest possible rating). Nine in ten 1 800 O-Canada clients said they were satisfied with the service they received. This is followed closely by OAS (84% satisfied), SIN (84%) and CPP (83%) clients.

We also find healthy satisfaction scores for EI (78%), Employment Assistance (76%) and AIG (72%) clients.

One in ten or fewer clients declare themselves to be dissatisfied with any service offering.

Satisfaction with Service (Specific) chart)

a) Drivers of Satisfaction

A factor analysis was performed on the data to examine the CMT measures. As in the 2006 survey, we find that virtually all of these variables are highly interrelated. Three factors emerge as particularly powerful: information quality, staff quality and access-speed (including accessibility and timeliness).

In terms of drivers of overall satisfaction, the most important dimensions are the quality of the staff and of the information provided.

Across the various programs we find the impact of the factors varying:

  • The quality of the staff is a more powerful driver for CPP Disability, EI Programs and SIN clients;
  • For OAS, the staff quality and information factors were strongest;
  • For GIS and CPP clients, information quality was the strongest driver;

We also find variations of drivers for client types:

  • Quality of staff is a key factor for client satisfaction for newcomers to Canada, persons with disabilities, and Aboriginal persons;
  • For men, staff quality is the strongest driver of satisfaction although the other drivers are also significant;
  • For youth, women and seniors, all three factors are similar drivers.